News

Posted 4.19.07

With deep sadness we are sorry to inform you that Dr. Theodore Mark Alfred, 81, former dean of our school, died on Easter Sunday, April 8, 2007. His family wrote a note about their and others’ great loss and we share that with you today.

Ted loved spending time outdoors with his friends and family, pursuing tennis, golf, fishing, and an occasional duck hunt. He was born in a rural, Swedish community in Polk, Nebraska, and was always proud of his small town heritage. This tight community not only supported Ted, but also his brother, Norris Alfred, a Pulitzer Prize nominee for his editorials in their hometown newspaper, The Polk Progress.

Ted was part of the greatest generation where work wasn’t a four-letter word and service wasn’t a duty, but a privilege. He joined the Marines in November 1943 and was stationed in the Pacific where he took part in the occupation of Japan, and gained appreciation for international relations. This love of cultures continued with his work in India as a Visiting Associate Professor of Industrial Relations in Calcutta. Under the Ford Foundation auspices he helped in the development of programs in research and education in management.

Ted received a BA from Doan College and an MBA degree from Northwestern University. He served in the Industrial Relations Center of the University of Chicago under the tutelage of Milton Friedman. Ted went on to receive his Ph.D. at MIT in Industrial Economics. In 1967 he joined the faculty at the newly named Case Western Reserve University. In 1971 he was appointed dean of the management school, which subsequently under his leadership and because of the very great generosity of Mr. Albert J. Weatherhead III, became the Weatherhead School of Management. This began a 13-year tenure marked by the school’s greatest period of growth and prestige.

In 1954, Ted married the love of his life, Catherine Croneis, leading to 52 long, happy devoted years. Together they raised four children, all in the greater Cleveland area. His lessons of hard work and community service live on in his children and their chosen professions.

Ted’s competitive nature and fun-loving attitude was always evident on the tennis court, golf course, or the fishing boat. He was the first to tell you his ding shot was in, his drive was the longest, and his fish was soooooo big. His quick wit, patience and diligence always paid off.

He lives on, not because of his academic or business accolades, although they were important, but rather due to his life lessons he professed in his everyday actions of honest, integrity, devotion to higher learning, faith in others, and love of family.

Ted will be missed greatly by his loving wife, Catherine, son, Norris (Judy), daughters, Christine (Rob), Caryn (Nate) and Caryl (Jay), his seven grandchildren, and his surviving sister, Phyllis Lyttle.

Those of us at Case who knew and worked with Ted loved and respected him. We will never forget and will always honor his contributions to the Weatherhead School. Also important to us, though, is that his life touched our own lives in such a way that the gift of thoughtful care he provided to us was realized at the very core of who we have become, and we are grateful.

A memorial service will be held at 4 p.m. on May 3 at the Amasa Stone Chapel on the Case Western Reserve campus.

 

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